chibiusaidwhat replied to your post: fredericktrumper asked:”presentat…

oh thanks for the explanation, for a second thought i thought you were too much of a stick in a mud when it comes to fanarts..

too much a stick in the mud. suggesting that i am already a little bit of a stick in the mud… i’ll take it!

fredericktrumper replied to your post: anonymous asked:I understand your…

no, anon, i really don’t think you understand frustration with binary gender unless you actually have a non-binary gender or are actively trying to support us, smh

fredericktrumper asked: racebending is different because it's more in tune with "changing race" rather than "switching race" and doesn't imply that there's only 2 races
Anonymous asked: I understand your frustration with binary gender. For me genderbend and racebend are fantastic. I treat the character as the same personality, and it often works despite the changes. It shows the underrepresentation of minorities in popular fiction.

i’m not saying the artwork is wrong, i’m saying the term we use to describe it is wrong. as explained in a previous act, the word “gendering”/”genderbending” is dehumanizing to trans women in particular, and should not be used. there are alternatives, like “cis swap” or “presentation play”.

i never even said anything about racebending. for the record, i love racebending.

#anon  #ask  
Anonymous asked: my vote goes to "presentation play" because it's fucking adorable but since it's definitely less common, you'd probably want to define it somewhere on the tags page.

yeah, unfortunately “gender bend” is the most popular and i rarely ever see anyone use anything else, so no matter what you use you’ll probably ending up having to explain what it means at some point. or at least why you use it instead, since i would think people would be able to put it in context.

#anon  #ask  
Anonymous asked: I heard someone use "binary bending"... thoughts?

i’ve never heard that before, so i wouldn’t be able to say if it’s ok or not.

#anon  #ask  
fredericktrumper asked: "presentation play" is a good phrase for "genderbend" because "genderbend" has been used in many many objectifying and dehumanizing ways referring, mostly, to trans women. plus "presentation play" has alliteration.

and who doesn’t love alliteration!

Anonymous asked: i know this isn't disney related but you seem to be up with the times... is it racist if i absolutely do not like gospel music much like people blatantly hate country music or rap music? i have nothing against african americans or their culture or anything, i just find their music doesn't appeal to me in any way

not as far as i know. i guess it would depend on why you hate gospel music. i’m guessing you don’t like it because… you just don’t. that kind of music doesn’t appeal to ur ears, the style and the composition and all that.

it might be worth considering if you’ve ever heard gospel music by a white person and been more receptive to that. the way that some people who say that hate rap music don’t really hate rap music, they hate artists like jay z and nicki minaj, but enjoy artists like macklemore and eminem. as far as i’ve heard, that’s not really as common a phenomenon with gospel music as it is with rap, but definitely worth thinking about.

edit: i just noticed you said “i just find their music doesn’t appeal to me” which is kind of an issue because not music by african americans sound the same? if you mean just gospel, than say gospel. african americans make a lot of the same kinds of music that white people do, so saying “their music doesn’t appeal to me” does have racist undertones, however unintentional.

#anon  #ask  
Anonymous asked: the "genderbent" thing is actually a very good point. i'm gonna use 'rule 63' from now on, but a lot of people aren't familiar with this whole 'rules of the internet' things and i was wondering is there some another way of saying 'art that presents a female-bodied character in a male body'? 'inebend' maybe? since it's a feminINE character looking masculINE?

"female-bodied" and "male body" are… not very good terms (i actually just learned this so i’m excited to share!!!" because not all female and male bodies look the same. for example, a male body with breasts and a vagina is just as male as a male body with a penis, you know? the gender of the body is determined by the person whose body it is, not by the way the body looks.

i think princessjanecrocker suggested “cis swap” as a good alternative. renamok uses “presentation play”.

#anon  #ask  
Anonymous asked: I don't mean this to be rude but what is the problem with the term gender bent/gender bend/etc? I just didn't know that it was a problem. What term should be used instead?

joanosaurus:

fuckyeahdisneyfanart:

well 99.99999% of “gender bent” artwork is taking an assumed cis character and making them “look” like the opposite cis gender, implying that a) males look a certain way and females look a certain way and b) there are only two genders. like, in the case of elsa, it would be giving her the appearance of what most people would expect men to look like, when really elsa’s canon appearance could also be exactly what a man looks like. it takes the word “gender” and reinforces the idea that there are only two genders, and each of the two genders “look” a certain way - men always present masculine and women always present feminine - and that’s just not the case.

i use “rule 63” for any art i post along this vein, but i know some people would just prefer that we don’t draw this kind of art at all. or, if we’re going to do it, we change the way that we do it. like, if we’re going to draw elsa appearing masculine, we don’t have to say she’s a different gender. she could just as easily still be a woman if she looked like benedict cumberbatch, though that would be very unfortunate for her and i’m still not sure why anyone would want to draw anything looking like benedict cumberbatch

i am very sick of this place

i sure hope you’re sick of transphobes being insensitive to trans people, and not people showing compassion and respect to trans people who are often not treated with either.

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